Tag Archives: photography

Featured Artist – Jeneen Hobby

16 Aug

Jeneen Hobby – My interest in photography began with the study of nature. The beauty, grandeur, and complexity of life on this planet are my subjects. From the grand vistas of the Rocky Mountains to the rocky coastline of Maine, I have been enthralled by the majesty of nature. But I am as captivated by a small detail as I am by a sweeping landscape. Indeed, you may see in some of my images an interest in exploring the patterns nature makes in an abstract way, from a close-up of the bark of a Rainbow Eucalyptus tree in south Florida, to a reflection of the Everett Covered Bridge and autumn leaves in Cuyahoga Valley National Park. 

          But my love for photography extends also to humanity and what it has created. In addition to traveling the United States, I have spent time in Asia and the Middle East—from China, India, Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand, and Laos, to Yemen and Dubai. On these journeys I aim to capture the essence of a place, which can occur in the smile of a novice monk on the Tibetan Plateau; or in the art and architecture of an ancient civilization, such as when the Cambodian jungle overtakes the Angkor complex, or when the sun warms the top of a 400-year old “skyscraper” in Sana’a, Yemen.

          My most recent body of work comes from Ohio, where I live and work. In revisiting familiar places to photograph them, I always discover something new. I have been exploring close-ups and abstractions lately, including the bark of a London Plane tree in Cleveland’s Ohio City neighborhood, the steel curves and shapes of the Peter B. Lewis building designed by Frank Gehry on Case Western Reserve’s campus, and the brightly colored glow of Christmas lights at Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens in Akron. It’s the magic of “writing with light” that I continue to explore. 

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Featured Artist – Grace McConnell

2 Aug

HI, I’m Grace McC(onnell)! I’m a freelance photographer serving in Cleveland OH, and Pittsburgh, PA. I have my Bachelor’s of Art in Studio Art from Baldwin Wallace University.

   Originally an oil painter, I fell in love with photography my sophomore year of college. I’ve been shootin’ people and places ever since.

   I specialize in headshots of all kinds, but I enjoy engagement sessions and lifestyle portraits (families, branding sessions, children.) Basically I’m just a big fan of people and capturing their most precious moments in life!

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BereArtDay is this Saturday!

15 May

2017 BereArtDay Flier 1.jpg

Berea Arts Fest is Loved by Artists – Why is Surprising

10 Apr

BAF PostTop 5 reasons why successful artists love the Berea Arts Fest and why you will too.

The Berea Arts Fest is a one-day multimedia arts festival that draws more than 10,000 art enthusiasts to Berea’s historical Triangle on Front St.  Artists, musicians, dancers, and exceptional food set the stage for a great day for every guest and every artist. You may be surprised by the top 5 reasons that artists say keeps them coming back to the Berea Arts Fest:

  1. Hospitality: The Berea Arts Fest is known for providing displaying artists the support they need to help them have a successful day! From a hot cup of coffee, to a snack, or a booth-sitter when they need a break, the Berea Arts Fest is a great host to artists.
  2. Energy: The Berea Arts Fest Takes the word “festival” seriously! Every moment of the day s packed with performances, interactive experiences, music, and more.  Surprises keep guests eager to see and engage artists’ booths.
  3. Location: The Berea Arts Fest continues to refine booth locations and festival layout to maximize traffic and exposure so that every artist is featured.
  4. Feedback: After each Arts Fests, we ask artists for a review as well as their input on how the Fest can be improved. Every year you can see refinements based on artists’ feedback, which make the BAF an artist’s top choice for late summer festivals.
  5. Ease: Artists tell us that the Berea Arts Fest is easy to get to, it’s low cost and they do well in sales.

 

Apply to the Berea Arts Fest by April 23Click Here!

See you there.

Featured Artist – Nancy Luken

15 Aug

Nancy Luken – Inspired by found objects, patterns and nature, my career is in creating items that push the imagination and curiosity of the onlooker. 

After practicing ceramic art for a decade and graduating from The College of Wooster with a Bachelors in Studio Art (having focused mostly on sculptural and figurative work), I found myself with the desire for a change in medium. I was also looking to create artistic pieces that have function. I wanted to work with wood and metal but at the time did not have the means for producing work from the raw materials.

Thus began my journey into the world of found objects. I browse thrift stores and garage sales looking for the old and unusual. I search for shapes and forms that have withstood the test of time. I look for items that are visually interesting outside of their function and determine how I can reorient them, change their context, and create new imagery.

Featured Artist – Jeneen Hobby

12 Aug

Jeneen Hobby – I first began to study photography seriously in 2003, after having experimented with a Pentax K-1000 and darkroom experience in college. In 2003 I traveled to Yellowstone National Park to study with Sandra Nykerk. Since then I have studied with Sam Abell, Tim Cooper, Doug Johnson, Jim Roetzel, Eddie Soloway, Brenda Tharp, and Larry Ulrich, in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, and in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

          My interest in photography began with the study of nature. The beauty, grandeur, and complexity of life on this planet are my subjects. From the grand vistas of the Rocky Mountains to the rocky coastline of Maine, I have been enthralled by the majesty of nature. But I am as captivated by a small detail as I am by a sweeping landscape. Indeed, you may see in some of my images an interest in exploring the patterns nature makes in an abstract way, from a close-up of the bark of a Rainbow Eucalyptus tree in south Florida, to a reflection of the Everett Covered Bridge and autumn leaves in Cuyahoga Valley National Park. 

          But my love for photography extends also to humanity and what it has created. In addition to traveling the United States, I have spent time in Asia and the Middle East—from China, India, Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand, and Laos, to Yemen and Dubai. On these journeys I aim to capture the essence of a place, which can occur in the smile of a novice monk on the Tibetan Plateau; or in the art and architecture of an ancient civilization, such as when the Cambodian jungle overtakes the Angkor complex, or when the sun warms the top of a 400-year old “skyscraper” in Sana’a, Yemen.

          My most recent body of work comes from Ohio, where I live and work. In revisiting familiar places to photograph them, I always discover something new. I have been exploring close-ups and abstractions lately, including the bark of a London Plane tree in Cleveland’s Ohio City neighborhood, the steel curves and shapes of the Peter B. Lewis building designed by Frank Gehry on Case Western Reserve’s campus, and the brightly colored glow of Christmas lights at Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens in Akron. It’s the magic of “writing with light” that I continue to explore. 

Featured Artist – Lon Dittrick

25 Jul

Lon Dittrick – As a fine art photographer, my purpose in capturing an image is to evoke in the viewer the emotional response I experienced when witnessing “the moment” before me. This is much different than just “recording” the event in a moment of time through serendipity.
Many of the images I have captured, developed, and chosen to display have brought me literally to tears in appreciation of the astounding beauty and majesty of creation before me during that moment of inspiration. This may vary in scope from a vast expanse of a mountain vista to the glorious minutiae present in the structure of a cactus flower. My desire is for those viewing my images to experience that same emotional response. The creative challenge is to take the image which is seen and emotionally experienced by the photographer, capture it through the very limited and indifferent image capturing machine we call a camera, and reproduce it so that the viewer can “be there” with the photographer at that moment in time, crying those same tears of inspiration.